Dana Hookins
54 York Drive
Flagstaff Hill
ph. (08) 8270 8045
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In this quarterly’s newsletter I’m going to talk about improved bowel motions – I know it’s not a very glamorous subject but as we all know a very important one.

A large number of my clients have experienced constipation, either on a regular basis, or at certain times in their life.

We all know about increasing the consumption of filtered water into our daily routine, along with regular exercise and a more fibrous diet, and of course eliminating, or at least reducing, processed foods and sugars. There has been so much already said, and written about that.

However something I have come across over the last few months is the importance of our position when eliminating our bowels. In fact to put it bluntly, we here in the western world are pooing incorrectly – except for toddlers who are running around with nappies on – we should be squatting and not sitting.

Giulia Enders has a medical doctorate in microbiology and she was interviewed on the ABC Lateline programme talking about the importance of good gut health and the link between good gut health and good mental health. It is just a short interview and I have attached the link if you are interested.

http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2015/s4266602.htm

Giulia Enders wrote a book titled “Charming Bowels” and Annalisa Barbieri from The Guardian newspaper interviewed her and described her as

‘charmingly obsessed with the gut, gut bacteria and poo … Enders tells me about various studies that show that we do it more efficiently if we squat. This is because the closure mechanism of the gut is not designed to “open the hatch completely” when we’re sitting down or standing up: it’s like a kinked hose.

Squatting is far more natural and puts less pressure on our bottoms. She says: “1.2 billion people around the world who squat have almost no incidence of diverticulosis and fewer problems with piles. We in the west, on the other hand, squeeze our gut tissue until it comes out of our bottoms.”

I had heard of this before, and, prior to reading Annalisa’s article and listening to the interview with Giulia Enders, I had done some earlier research on a product called the “Squatty Potty” (as you can tell from the name, an American product J ) which is simply a stool that you put your feet up on while sitting on the toilet. The idea being, that when your knees are raised with your feet on the stool, there is a 30° angle from your hips to your knees, thereby simulating the squatting positon. You can also use the stool to raise yourself into a squat position if you are agile enough, however leaning forward while sitting is sufficient.

You can try this out for yourself by using some old telephone books or shoe boxes.

Those of you who receive Dr Joseph Mercola’s newsletters may have read about it there or if you watch Dr Oz or any of those programmes.

I have attached a link that has some utube video’s of the product being discussed on programmes such as “Doctors” and “Shark Tank” as well as a link to Dr Mercola’s article.

http://www.squattypotty.com/videos/

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/03/toilet-squatting-position.aspx

So once again like Giulia Enders the doctors on the programme talk about

“When we’re sitting this bend, called the anorectal angle, is kinked which puts upward pressure on the rectum and keeps the feces inside.

This creates the need to STRAIN in order to eliminate. Compare sitting on the toilet to a kinked garden hose, it just doesn’t work properly.

In a squatting posture the bend straightens out and defecation becomes easier.

Assuming the squat position is the natural way to achieve easier and more complete elimination. Research has shown that in some people, the kink is completely gone while squatting.”

The following complaints seem to be common in western society:

Constipation; Haemorrhoids; Colon Disease; Urinary Difficulty/Infections; Pelvic Floor Issues and if they can be eliminated through simply changing the position of going to the toilet wouldn’t that be a great thing.

In this quarterly’s newsletter I’m going to talk about improved bowel motions – I know it’s not a very glamorous subject but as we all know a very important one.

A large number of my clients have experienced constipation, either on a regular basis, or at certain times in their life.
We all know about increasing the consumption of filtered water into our daily routine, along with regular exercise and a more fibrous diet, and of course eliminating, or at least reducing, processed foods and sugars. There has been so much already said, and written about that.

However something I have come across over the last few months is the importance of our position when eliminating our bowels. In fact to put it bluntly, we here in the western world are pooing incorrectly – except for toddlers who are running around with nappies on – we should be squatting and not sitting.

Giulia Enders has a medical doctorate in microbiology and she was interviewed on the ABC Lateline programme talking about the importance of good gut health and the link between good gut health and good mental health. It is just a short interview and I have attached the link if you are interested.
http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2015/s4266602.htm

Giulia Enders wrote a book titled “Charming Bowels” and Annalisa Barbieri from The Guardian newspaper interviewed her and described her as
‘charmingly obsessed with the gut, gut bacteria and poo … Enders tells me about various studies that show that we do it more efficiently if we squat. This is because the closure mechanism of the gut is not designed to “open the hatch completely” when we’re sitting down or standing up: it’s like a kinked hose.
Squatting is far more natural and puts less pressure on our bottoms. She says: “1.2 billion people around the world who squat have almost no incidence of diverticulosis and fewer problems with piles. We in the west, on the other hand, squeeze our gut tissue until it comes out of our bottoms.”

I had heard of this before, and, prior to reading Annalisa’s article and listening to the interview with Giulia Enders, I had done some earlier research on a product called the “Squatty Potty” (as you can tell from the name, an American product  ) which is simply a stool that you put your feet up on while sitting on the toilet. The idea being, that when your knees are raised with your feet on the stool, there is a 30° angle from your hips to your knees, thereby simulating the squatting positon. You can also use the stool to raise yourself into a squat position if you are agile enough, however leaning forward while sitting is sufficient.
You can try this out for yourself by using some old telephone books or shoe boxes.

Those of you who receive Dr Joseph Mercola’s newsletters may have read about it there or if you watch Dr Oz or any of those programmes.
I have attached a link that has some utube video’s of the product being discussed on programmes such as “Doctors” and “Shark Tank” as well as a link to Dr Mercola’s article.
http://www.squattypotty.com/videos/
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/12/03/toilet-squatting-position.aspx

So once again like Giulia Enders the doctors on the programme talk about
“When we’re sitting this bend, called the anorectal angle, is kinked which puts upward pressure on the rectum and keeps the feces inside.
This creates the need to STRAIN in order to eliminate. Compare sitting on the toilet to a kinked garden hose, it just doesn’t work properly.
In a squatting posture the bend straightens out and defecation becomes easier.
Assuming the squat position is the natural way to achieve easier and more complete elimination. Research has shown that in some people, the kink is completely gone while squatting.”

The following complaints seem to be common in western society:
Constipation; Haemorrhoids; Colon Disease; Urinary Difficulty/Infections; Pelvic Floor Issues and if they can be eliminated through simply changing the position of going to the toilet wouldn’t that be a great thing.